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Past Events

  • 2019 Penn Symposium on Contemporary China

    Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104

    The Penn Symposium on Contemporary China (PSCC) is an annual event organized by undergraduate students from the University of Pennsylvania. The 2019 Symposium will take place in March 30, 2019 on the University of Pennsylvania campus. We aim to provide a unique high-level academic forum for the discussion of the political, legal, economic, and social factors shaping China and its role in the world today. The 2019 conference will feature Chinese American freelance writer and musician Kaiser Kuo as the keynote address speaker.

    For more infrormation, please click here.

  • Nathan Hopson-"Ingrained Habits: The (Bio) politics of American Wheat Promotion and the Transformation of Japan Diet and Identity, 1956-1960"

    Stiteler Hall, Room: B26 (208 South 37th Street)

    This presentation explores the history and politics of US-funded food demonstration buses (“kitchen cars”) in postwar Japan, 1954-1960. The kitchen cars’ express mission was to transform the Japanese national diet by teaching Japanese women how to cook cheap, nutritious, fare using American agricultural products, especially wheat to improve the health of their families and the nation. America propped up its Cold War ally and developed an important export market for politically important farmers. And because Japan welcomed the kitchen cars as an effective tool to teach rational, nutritious cooking for economic resurgence, they contributed to national dietary transformation.

  • Bart Édes-"Economic Impacts of the US-China Trade Conflict on Developing Asia and the US"

    The Forum, 2 nd Floor, Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics

    The 2018 trade conflict between the United States and the People’s Republic of China has affected not only bilateral trade, but also disrupted supply chains and production networks globally. Foreign investors and exporters on different continents have scrambled to factor the conflict into their business plans. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has examined the economic impact of the tariffs applied to date, and considered the potential impact of further trade actions that have been threatened. The presentation will discuss the economic impacts of the conflict on Asia and the United States. Additionally, it will highlight key development challenges, the role of ADB, and the changing landscape for development in the world's most populous region.

  • Peter Kornicki - "Commodore Perry's Expedition as a Shopping Trip: The First Japanese Books in America"

    Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Kislak Center for Special Collections (6th floor Van Pelt Library)

    What was Perry’s crew doing while he was negotiating, and what was everybody, including Commodore Perry himself, doing when the ships visited Shimoda and Hakodate, Japan? They were shopping! They bought lacquerware, porcelain, fans and a host of other things, but they also bought books. And one of those books was reproduced using a new technology and published in Philadelphia in 1855. In this talk I will explore the background to the arrival of the first Japanese books in America, but of course the problem was that nobody could read them.

  • Chin-Huat Wong - "Is 'New Malaysia' real or sustainable? - A critical assessment on Malaysia's social divide and political system"

    CSCC Conference Room 418 (4th Floor Perelman Building)

    When democracy went wrong in so many countries, Malaysia's peaceful regime change in May 2019 that ended the world's longest one-party rule with elections after Mexico's PRI was widely acclaimed. At home and abroad, many hailed the birth of a New Malaysia, but the euphoria had evaporated within months. On one hand, New Malaysia looks hollow as many reforms promised by the new Alliance of Hope (PH) government are delayed, compromised or outright abandoned. On the other hand, New Malaysia triggers the fear of many Malay-Muslims that their ethnic privileges and religious supremacy will be eroded.

  • Anri Yasuda- "More than “A Feeling of Beauty”: Aesthetics in Natsume Sōseki’s Early Literary Thought"

    Stiteler Hall, Room: B26 (208 South 37th Street)

    Natsume Sōseki, perhaps the most renowned writer of early-twentieth century Japan, stated that his aim in writing the novel Kusamakura (1906) had been purely aesthetic: “I would be satisfied if a kind of feeling—a feeling of beauty—remains in the mind of the reader.” The novel, full of references to iconic works of visual art and composed largely of poetic vignettes with little in the way of dramatic development, has since been hailed as a radical experiment in modernist writing. But Kusamakura ends on an enigmatic note that suggests that the quest for beauty may not be enough for modern literature.  

  • Kim Program Film Screening: Peppermint Candy

    Backtracking from his suicide as a broken and depressed man, this film recounts the life of Yong-ho (Kyung-gu Sol), from his tragic demise to his innocent and idealistic youth, in reverse order. In between, he is a student with photography aspirations, a soldier, a police officer and eventually an investor who loses a small fortune in the stock market. He is also a husband, but his marriage to Hong-ja (Yejin Kim) leaves them both unhappy as Yong-ho continues to obsess over someone else.

  • Film Event:Hao Wu-"People's Republic of Desire"

    David Rittenhouse Lab, A8

    Please reserve your free ticket here

    Film screening and discussion with Director Hao Wu, moderated by Isaac Stone Fish

  • Film Screening of "Summer Wars"

    Annenberg 111

    Anime Apocalypse: The Fall of the City is a February film series, co-sponsored by the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia and the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.   This series will explore the catastrophic end of urban establishments in four animated films: AKIRAPatlabor 2: The MovieSummer Wars, and Godzilla: City on the Edge of Battle.  Each film imagines the destruction of Tokyo in the near or distant future and the heroic men and women who struggle to preserve the structure of urban life.

  • Film Screening of "Godzilla: City on the Edge of Battle"

    Annenberg 111

    Anime Apocalypse: The Fall of the City is a February film series, co-sponsored by the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia and the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.   This series will explore the catastrophic end of urban establishments in four animated films: AKIRA, Patlabor 2: The Movie, Summer Wars, and Godzilla: City on the Edge of Battle.  Each film imagines the destruction of Tokyo in the near or distant future and the heroic men and women who struggle to preserve the structure of urban life.